University of Saskatchewan – Internal Medicine – Saskatoon
Program Director

Dr. Jessie Baptiste

Program Administrator

Janna Ethier

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Resident Experience

Samuel Harder
PGY-3
The biggest strengths of the program are its size, the diverse pathology seen, and the acuity level managed. The relatively small size of the program means that we are a tight knit group and we are not in competition with other residents to get procedures or opportunities to manage interesting cases. The program is not so small however, that we are constantly short on residents. This means it is easier to re-arrange call schedules as needed and arrange for much needed vacation time without much difficulty. The pathology in Saskatoon is diverse and fascinating and because we are one of only two major centres in the province if a patient needs tertiary level care they will be admitted to Saskatoon or Regina and you will be involved in the case as a resident. Also, as there are no subspecialty admitting services in Saskatoon other than Cardiology, which means you will have exposure to a broad range of cases while on CTU. Your case load as a junior resident could include GI bleed, infective endocarditis, Tuberculosis, AECOPD and heart failure all on the same day. This kind of diversity makes for fantastic learning and keeps your days interesting and engaging. We are also a group of residents that pride ourselves on learning how to manage acuity well. We frequently manage acutely unwell patients on the ward and the ER being transferred from the periphery for higher level care. We also take part in a one-year curriculum combined with ER, surgery, and anesthesia focused on simulation, vascular access procedures, and basic ultrasound in resuscitation scenarios that quickly hones your resuscitation skills.
The best part about being a resident in Saskatoon is getting to see a huge variety of pathology in my day-to-day work and being supported by a group of incredibly collegial and welcoming staff. I enjoy getting to manage heart failure, acute infections, altered LOC and weakness NYD all in the same day. I also enjoy the acuity of patients I have learned how to manage.
The Saskatoon resident community is great. We are a collegial group of residents that get along well. We have supportive staff that are there to help us learn and get better as physicians. The Resident doctors of Saskatchewan also does a great job representing resident doctors in Saskatchewan and provides us with great benefits and support.
Outside of being a resident, life in Saskatoon is fun. Being a BC transplant myself, I have found many great activities to do here. The cross-country skiing is great. You can ski in town at night so it is easy to get out after work and there are many other trails either in town or close by. The canoeing in northern Saskatchewan is world class and there is fantastic fishing all around. Saskatoon is a fantastic small city with great restaurants, local coffee roasters, and breweries. The summer is packed with endless festivals from Jazz fest to Fringe fest. The winters are cold and long but the trails are still open for running and there are many outdoor rinks.
The core IM program at the U of S is doing great work when it comes to resident wellness. All residents that enter the program go through the Resident Doctors of Canada Resiliency workshop. There are wellness academic half days every 6-8 weeks consisting of debriefing sessions, yoga classes, finance talks, transitions in medicine, skills to bolster resiliency and wellness or just time to hang out with colleagues and catch up on life tasks. All residents are scheduled for two consecutive weeks of holidays throughout the year as part of their yearly schedule to ensure that everyone gets at least two weeks off. This takes a lot of stress out of trying to plan all of the holidays for a year, in addition to these two weeks all residents are allowed an additional two weeks and are guaranteed 6 consecutive days off over either Christmas or New Years.
The biggest strengths of the program are its size, the diverse pathology seen, and the acuity level managed. The relatively small size of the program means that we are a tight knit group and we are not in competition with other residents to get procedures or opportunities to manage interesting cases. The program is not so small however, that we are constantly short on residents. This means it is easier to re-arrange call schedules as needed and arrange for much needed vacation time without much difficulty. The pathology in Saskatoon is diverse and fascinating and because we are one of only two major centres in the province if a patient needs tertiary level care they will be admitted to Saskatoon or Regina and you will be involved in the case as a resident. Also, as there are no subspecialty admitting services in Saskatoon other than Cardiology, which means you will have exposure to a broad range of cases while on CTU. Your case load as a junior resident could include GI bleed, infective endocarditis, Tuberculosis, AECOPD and heart failure all on the same day. This kind of diversity makes for fantastic learning and keeps your days interesting and engaging. We are also a group of residents that pride ourselves on learning how to manage acuity well. We frequently manage acutely unwell patients on the ward and the ER being transferred from the periphery for higher level care. We also take part in a one-year curriculum combined with ER, surgery, and anesthesia focused on simulation, vascular access procedures, and basic ultrasound in resuscitation scenarios that quickly hones your resuscitation skills.

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