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— Program Information
CaRMS - UBC Medical Oncology

Program Highlights

Program information to come.

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General Information

This residency program is for 5 years.

Program length of training does not exceed the Royal College or College of Family Physicians of Canada standard.

 

RESIDENCY PROGRAM OBJECTIVES

Intent of Objectives

The objectives outline the minimum requirements of a graduate in Ophthalmology following five years of training. Individual differences in talent and capacity should be recognized and, when possible met to the fullest extent by the Department. The objectives provide guidance for resident evaluations and if expectations are not fulfilled such failure may be cause for dismissal. The Department will provide opportunities for learning through didactic means as well as observation and hands-on experience. Ultimately it will be the resident’s responsibility to take advantage of these experiences.

General Goals of Residency Training

To produce a high quality Ophthalmologist with the following abilities:

Medical Expert:

– The knowledge and ability to exercise sound clinical judgment in dealing with ophthalmic medical surgical and optical problems.

– The insight to recognize his/her limitations

– The ability and knowledge required to adequately prepare and present the Royal College professional examination

Communicator:

– The ability to communicate with patients and their relatives regarding ophthalmic conditions, their management and potential consequences.

Collaborator:

– The ability to relate productively with other medical professionals and allied staff

– The desire and ability to share his/her knowledge and the enthusiasm to teach future generations of doctors and allied staff.

Leader:

– The management and prioritization skills necessary to deliver excellent patient care.

Scholar:

– The desire and ability to continue to update his/her knowledge.

– The motivation and energy to further develop the knowledge and practice of ophthalmology through research.

Professional:

– The highest ethical standards of the profession

Health advocate:

– Familiarity with the culture of advocacy on behalf of patients and sensitivity to issues such as culture, age and ethnicity.

 

 

 

OBJECTIVES BY TRAINING YEAR PGY-1 – subject to change

The PGY1 rotation is designed to provide the Resident with a mix of medical and surgical specialties, with an emphasis to those which are most pertinent to the study practice of ophthalmology. The design may vary to some extent, though the basic outline should include 13 four-week rotating attachments:


PGY1 Programs MUST provide the following:

 

Minimum 1 month

*Internal Medicine (eg CTU) or its Specialties (excludes Neurology)

*Pediatrics or its specialties (excludes surgical specialties)

*Neurology

*Emergency Medicine

*Neuroradiology (general Radiology is acceptable )

*Plastic Surgery

General Surgery

Psychiatry

Family Practice

 

Additionally:

4 weeks of one of the following (at the discretion of the site – resident choice if resources allow)

Endocrine

Rheumatology

Infectious Diseases

Dermatology

Obstetrics

One 2 week elective (note, two weeks)

 

*Note: Total Internal Medical + its Specialties (excludes Neurology) not to exceed 3 months

Obstetrics and Gynecology MAY be required at some sites

 

Beginning in the 2021 – 2022 Academic year, our PGY1 residents also complete 8 weeks of Red Eye Ophthalmology rotation, at our Vancouver sites.  In addition, the final 6 weeks of PGY1 will be spent at the Toronto Basic Ophthalmology course

 

Asterisk * indicates a requirement of the RCPSC STR in Ophthalmology

 

 

 

 

 

OBJECTIVES BY TRAINING YEAR PGY-2

Ophthalmology is a specialty which has unique technology and its own vocabulary. The first year will be spent in introductory clinical aspects of the subjects and the acquisition of the basic skills required to investigate ophthalmic disease.

1. The basic sciences of anatomy of the eye and orbit, ocular physiology, and optics will be introduced and correlated with clinical cases.

2. The use and care of ophthalmic instruments will be demonstrated.

3. The residents will be taught to be comfortable handling most ophthalmic emergencies and acquire a basic knowledge of medical and surgical ophthalmic problems. When on duty, the resident will perform the examination and treatment of patients attending the Emergency Department with eye problems; when necessary, they will consult on cases with a senior resident.  Should a senior resident not be available, the consultation should occur with the staff person on-call.

4. An initial approach to microsurgery will occur using “hands on” techniques with, then without supervision in the wet-lab as well as didactic teaching methods..

5. Through the ambulatory care clinics (Section E and St Paul’s Hospital clinics), an initial approach to clinical problem-solving and diagnostic skills will be taught.

6. The diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of cornea disease.

7. The diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of neuro-ophthalmology

8. The diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of pathology.

9. The diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of retinal and vitreal disease.

10. The diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of oculoplastics.

11. The diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of orbital disease.

 

 

 

OBJECTIVES BY TRAINING YEAR PGY-3

The PGY3 year will consolidate the resident’s knowledge of basic science and the following sub-specialty subjects.  Ambulatory Care Clinic, Cornea and External disease, Pediatric Ophthalmology, Glaucoma and Clinics at St. Paul’s Hospital.

1.An increased level of expertise will be expected from the resident attending the Ambulatory Clinics. The clinical knowledge in managing patient problems should be greater than in the first year of training. Also, more efficiency in clinical care of patients will be expected.

2.The residents will obtain training in cornea, external disease and uveitis to cover the diagnosis and treatment of the major diseases in this area.

3. The diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of pediatric and strabismus ophthalmology.

4. The residents will develop skills in glaucoma.

 

 

 

 

OBJECTIVES BY TRAINING YEAR PGY-4

1.The resident will obtain the knowledge and skills necessary to understand the indications for, the complications of, and the ability to perform anterior segment surgery.

2.The resident will obtain the necessary skills and knowledge to understand the diagnosis, treatment, and complications of retinal pathology.

3.The diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of orbital disease.

4.The diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of oculoplastics.

5. The diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of pediatric and strabismus ophthalmology.

6. An increased level of expertise will be expected from the resident attending Ambulatory Clinics.

 

 

OBJECTIVES BY TRAINING PGY-5

1.The resident will obtain the knowledge and skills necessary to understand the indications for, the complications of, and the ability to perform anterior segment surgery. Residents will make every effort to involve themselves in the follow-up of surgical cases to gain an accurate insight into the effect of surgery.  This is particularly important for patients in whose care they have been personally involved.

2.The diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of Glaucoma.

3.The diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of Neuro/Tumour

4. An increased level of expertise will be expected from the resident attending the Ambulatory Clinics.  The clinical knowledge in managing patient problems should be greater than in the PGY4 year of training.

 

 

 

Research

The program requires that residents actively participate in or lead research projects in years PGY2 onwards.  Residents have time set aside in the schedule for this purpose.  The department has a resident research director and is closely affiliated with many visual scientists and clinical researchers with an interest in working with residents.  UBC also allows for residents to take part in its Clinical Investigator Program which allows individuals to suspend their residency program for a period of two years while completing requirements for an advanced degree.  (http://www.cipubc.ca/).  Residents present at our annual research day and funds are also available to present original research at academic meetings.

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Salary Information

Post graduate salaries and benefits differ by province and are determined by two things: your training year, and the province you work in. See below the salaries and benefits for University of British Columbia - Ophthalmology - Vancouver.
British Columbia
Gross Annual PGY-1 Salary
$65,332.37
Gross Annual PGY-2 Salary
$72,818.39
Gross Annual PGY-3 Salary
$79,301.62
Gross Annual PGY-4 Salary
$85,318.65
Gross Annual PGY-5 Salary
$91,710.67
Gross Annual PGY-6 Salary
$97,877.39
Gross Annual PGY-7 Salary
$104,271.09
Educational Leave
Yes
Annual Vacation
4 weeks
Meal Allowance
No
Frequency of Calls
1 in 4 onsite/1 in 3 offsite
Maternity Leave
17 weeks, plus up to 78 weeks Parental Leave
Provincial Health Insurance
100% Premiums Paid
Provincial Dues (% of salary)
1.50%
Extended Health Insurance
100% Premiums Paid
CMPA Dues Paid
Yes, mandatory
Dental Plan
100% Premiums Paid
Statutory Holidays
2x pay plus extra day with pay
Long-Term Disability Insurance
Yes 100% Premiums Paid
Sick Leave
Yes
Life Insurance
100% Premiums Paid
Updated July 25, 2023

Terms of Agreement April 1, 2019 to March 31, 2022
Resident Doctors of BC website

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Vancouver
Vancouver (/vænˈkuːvər/ (listen) van-KOO-vər) is a major city in western Canada, located in the Lower Mainland region of British Columbia. As the most populous city in the province, the 2021 Canadian census recorded 662,248 people in the city, up from 631,486 in 2016. The Greater Vancouver area had a population of 2.6 million in 2021, making it the third-largest metropolitan area in Canada.

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