Queen’s University – Anatomical Pathology – Kingston
Program Director

Dr. Christopher Davidson

Program Administrator

Claudia Trost

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Program Details

Queen’s University – Anatomical Pathology – Kingston

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Kingston

 

 

Resident Experience

Michael Chen
PGY-4
Pathology training at Queen’s is centralized with all the residents and faculty together at one site. As a result, residents have a personalized office space during training, and we get to know all the pathologists and laboratory staff very well. • Queen’s was the first pathology program in Canada to introduce CBME. As trailblazers, we are not only well-adapted to CBME, but also our triumphs and struggles can serve as lessons for other programs. • Queen’s accepts IMGs every year and they have contributed different perspectives and life experiences to the resident cohort. • Queen’s has a high faculty-to-resident ratio, plus there are no fellows, and it is rare for more than one resident to be scheduled on the same rotation. Thus we get excellent one-on-one teaching time with attending pathologists.
For me, I wanted to learn at one centralized site and develop meaningful relationships with my colleagues instead of re-learning a new system every few months. I love that pathology training at Queen’s is centralized with all the residents and faculty together at one centre. I like that I have an office cubicle I can call my own and personalize it to my liking. I like that I have gotten to know my colleagues well over the years, including the pathologists’ assistants and laboratory technologists.
It’s a small program with ~10 residents who work in close proximity thus we get to know each other very well. The work dynamic is collegial and collaborative, and we support one another’s professional and personal lives. We periodically socialize after work, such as wine night or board games night.
My personal interests include calligraphy and musical theatre. These artistic pursuits allow me to utilize a different part of my brain and provide a change of pace from my regular job. I am very grateful that the lifestyle of a pathology resident permitted me to attend rehearsals and to take part in a couple of theatre productions. • My friends and I love taking advantage of the excellent food scene and summer patios in Kingston. We also like kayaking in Lake Ontario and going on walks in the many provincial parks or nature trails surrounding Kingston.
Everyone in the program very much respects the residents’ free time. For example, “no call requests” on the call schedule are almost always granted and there is essentially no difficulty in getting vacation requests approved.
I look forward to attending the CAP-ACP annual meeting in-person (which may or may not happen in 2022). The ability to physically network with colleagues and the opportunity to sightsee are sorely missed in virtual conferences.
Pathology training at Queen’s is centralized with all the residents and faculty together at one site. As a result, residents have a personalized office space during training, and we get to know all the pathologists and laboratory staff very well. • Queen’s was the first pathology program in Canada to introduce CBME. As trailblazers, we are not only well-adapted to CBME, but also our triumphs and struggles can serve as lessons for other programs. • Queen’s accepts IMGs every year and they have contributed different perspectives and life experiences to the resident cohort. • Queen’s has a high faculty-to-resident ratio, plus there are no fellows, and it is rare for more than one resident to be scheduled on the same rotation. Thus we get excellent one-on-one teaching time with attending pathologists.

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